Rabindranath Tagore & Pedagogy

Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore, popularly and most commonly known as a Poet, Short Story Writer, Play Writer, Song Composer, Novelist, essayist and a Painter also had interest in Theatre & Politics.

A few of his most popular works are:

  • Gitanjali,
  • Gora
  • Ghare-Baire
  • Rabindra Sangeet
  • Jana Gana Mana
  • Amar Shonar Bangla 

Tagore is the only composer whose compositions are adopted as National Anthems of two Nations – India and Bangladesh.  He was awarded the Noble Prize winner in Literature in 1913.  The Prize eventually gets stolen in 2004 from Visva-Bharati University.   The Swedish Academy however presented two replicas, one of Gold and the other of Bronze.

Tagore was also known to be a Pedagogue.  Pedagogue is a person who practices Pedagogy and Pedagogy is the art of education through instructions.  Modern pedagogy has been strongly influenced by the cognitivism of Piaget, 1926, 1936/1975; the social-interactionist theories of Bruner, 1960, 1966, 1971, 1986; and the social and cultural theories of Vygotsky, 1962. These theorists have laid a foundation for pedagogy where sequential development of individual mental processes—such as recognizing, recalling, analyzing, reflecting, applying, creating, understanding, and evaluating—are scaffolded. Students learn as they internalize the procedures, organization, and structures encountered in social contexts as their own schemata. The learner requires assistance to integrate prior knowledge with new knowledge. Children must also develop metacognition, or the ability to learn how to learn.

The word pedagogue actually relates to the slave who escorts Roman children to school. In Denmark, a pedagogue is a practitioner of pedagogy. The term is primarily used for individuals who occupy jobs in pre-school education (such as kindergartens and nurseries) in Scandinavia. But a pedagogue can occupy various kinds of jobs, e.g. in retirement homes, prisons, orphanages, and human resource management. These are often recognized as social pedagogues as they perform on behalf of society.

The pedagogue’s job is usually distinguished from a teacher’s by primarily focusing on teaching children life-preparing knowledge such as social skills and cultural norms, etc. There is also a very big focus on care and well-being of the child. Many pedagogical institutions also practice social inclusion. The pedagogue’s work also consists of supporting the child in his or her mental and social development.

In Denmark all pedagogues are trained at a series of national institutes for social educators located in all major cities. The programme is a 3.5-year academic course, giving the student the title of a Bachelor in Social Education (Danish: Professions bachelor som pædagog)

It is also possible to earn a master’s degree in pedagogy/educational science from the University of Copenhagen. This BA and MA program has a more theoretical focus compared to the above mentioned Bachelor in Social Education.

In Hungary, the word pedagogue (pedagógus) is synonymous with teacher (tanár); therefore, teachers of both primary and secondary schools may be referred to as pedagogues, a word that appears also in the name of their lobbyist organizations and labor unions (e.g. Labor Union of Pedagogues, Democratic Labor Union of Pedagogues). However, undergraduate education in Pedagogy does not qualify students to become teachers in primary or secondary schools but makes them able to apply to be educational assistants. As of 2013, the 5-year training period was re-installed in place of the undergraduate and postgraduate division which characterized the previous practice.

 

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